Love and Relationships: How To Talk To Parents About Interracial Relationships

Love is a wonderful thing and it can make the world a beautiful place to live in. This is the reason many are looking for love and if you have not found yours yet, then maybe it is time to look outside the box so to speak. Dating someone from a different race is not only exciting, but it opens up a new world for you to discover. Although interracial dating is common today and are widely accepted in the society, one has a long way to in terms of family acceptance especially if one’s parent’s do not approve of such relationships.

Overcoming Interracial Relationship Problems

Dating someone of a different color is a sensitive topic for some society especially those who strictly follow their culture and tradition. It can also be a big dilemma for one raised under these concepts and questions like “What their parents will think about the relationship?” and “What would others might think about them?” Many who date outside of their own race often have fears that their family will react negatively and would reject the relationship.

There are plenty of reasons for this fear such as incompatibility concerning one’s culture, ignorance and even misconceptions. That said if you are worried about how this would affect your relationship with your family, it is best to initiate it first to allay any fears that your parents might have about your relationship. It might be hard at the start, but doing it at the onset would save you some stress and help you enjoy your relationship.

Choosing the Best Way to Talk with your Parents

If you are not living at home, then you can opt to tell your parents about it during holidays or special events. If you think that they would react in a negative way, it is best to do so before your relatives arrive or after the party when the guest have departed. If you do not feel confident enough, you can drop in the news through lunch or over a phone conversation. It might be like a coward’s way to do so but it can save you from a lot of pressure and stress.

Be Calm and Prepared

Before you talk with your parents, it is best to be calm and come ready. Being calm will help you think about what you have to say when your parents question you about it. Show your parents that you are matured enough to handle any kind of relationship and are prepared for it. Some family members might react negatively and would start shouting or becoming emotional, by being calm, you will not add to the stressful situation.

If you have supportive family members, it is best to talk to them first so you can explain the situation and ask for their support should the time come when you have to talk to your parents. It is scary, but having someone to support you can boost your morale and confidence.

Do not Judge a Book by its Cover

At the end of the day, you might be surprise when they approve and accept your relationship. Although quite rare, many parents find it necessary to adjust to the situation at hand especially if you live in a different country or place. As dating someone from another race is not often discuss during family dinner or the topic never came up, you will never know what to expect.

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How to Write a Great Resume Summary With Examples

A resume summary is a concise summary of who you are and the value that you can bring to an organization. Today (2018), all strong resumes are expected to have resume summaries in place of the antiquated “Objective.” The resume summary is essentially your elevator speech, which is a very brief “commercial” of who you are and how you can benefit an organization.

What To Include

First, be certain to include a resume summary right after your contact information. Excluding a summary or just listing a few bullets about your qualifications (or worse listing an Objective) will nearly guarantee your resume gets passed unless you personally know the hiring manager. The resume summary is essentially a condensed version of the “Tell Me About Yourself Question.” When writing a summary, you want to ensure that you include relevant and specific information that showcases who you are without being too generic. A great summary will include who you are, what you’ve done, what value you bring, and what your strengths are. Also, you should always include your resume title above the resume summary to make it clear who you are (i.e. Sales Professional, IT Executive, Project Manager, etc.)

Keep It Short

You may have been in an industry for 20+ years and have done enough to fill 100+ pages of text; however, your summary shouldn’t be longer than five or six sentences. TheLadders (2017) conducted a study and showed that the average recruiter spends 6-seconds reviewing a resume, so your resume summary should be concise and compelling. You need to quickly capture the hiring managers attention and highlight your top-selling points or unique value proposition. Avoid being redundant and including too many generic sentences that can apply to anyone.

Three Great Resume Summary Examples:

Example #1 – Global Vice Chairman

Results-driven global executive with a proven track record of successfully building and leading communications businesses in North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, and Latin America. Expertise in corporate trust and reputation, operational leadership, business development, strategic planning, and streamlining operations to significantly increase revenue and profitability. Highly regarded commentator on issues of corporate trust, crisis, and corporate reputation for CNN, Bloomberg, CNBC, the BBC, and Channel News Asia in addition to delivering insights for print, trade, and other broadcast media on five continents. Presenter at the United Nations Global Compact Leaders Conference, the Clinton Global Initiative, The World Economic Forum’s Anti-Corruption Conference, FSG’s Shared Value Conference, and countless industry and client events.

Example #2 – Senior Sales Executive

Award-winning sales executive with vast experience in global sales/marketing and financial management. Expertise in sourcing and retaining new business as the deal lead and providing the framework for completing KYC due diligence for specialized clients. Demonstrated history of generating more than $100+ million in wins and bookings. Successful client-relations manager who understands client needs, manages expectations, builds lasting relationships, instills trust, and ensures the delivery of integrated solutions. Highly adept working in the FinTech industry.

Example #3 – Technical Director

Highly talented IT executive with a demonstrated track record of designing, building, and rolling out multi-million-dollar strategic, tactical IT, and operational solutions that significantly contributes to organizational performance. Oversaw the build-out of 450+ retail stores from a technology perspective including hardware, software, LAN/WAN, and telephony along with managing 350+ projects’ lifecycles from inception to rollout. Expertise in effectively leading teams, instilling passion, and developing people to achieve excellence. Strong ability to communicate with both technical and non-technical audiences.

All three of these examples clearly exemplify who the candidate is, what the candidate has done, what value the candidate brings, and what the candidates strengths are in a concise and compelling manner without unnecessary fluff. Fluff is a resume summary that’s filled with generic sentences like the example below:

Example #4 – Generic Fluff Summary

Energetic and creative professional with a cross-functional background in operations. History of working well with all levels of leadership and developing effective relationships. Strong ability to make immediate and valuable contributions to an organization. Flexible and open-minded with an outstanding ability to adapt to any situation. Excellent research, strategic thinking, communication, and presentation skills.

Conclusion

Think of your resume summary as the only thing a hiring manager will read, because in many cases it just may be. Your resume summary is your elevator pitch and should include who you are, what you’ve done, what value you bring, and what your strengths are in a concise and compelling manner. Remember to include your title above your summary to immediately identify who you are. You can use a generic “Professional Summary” or “Qualifications” if you have a very diverse background and it’s difficult to define who you are in a single title. Always remember to include a resume summary as candidates without one will surely be passed.